" A MARKETING BRAND BUILDING AGENCY FOR THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY "
TRANSITION YOUR BRAND TO THE NEXT LEVEL

Top Ten Right Moves

TEN RIGHT THINGS TO DO WHEN CREATING A BEAUTY BRAND

Once I tell my clients the most impor­tant steps “Not to Do” when devel­op­ing a beauty busi­ness, I begin to coach them on the most impor­tant steps “To Do”.

Not in any par­tic­u­lar order:

  1. Be very clear WHY you are in the busi­ness. There are lots of ways to make money and lots of dif­fer­ent prod­ucts to make. Why did you choose some­thing for the beauty busi­ness? What drew you to it? What do you like about it? Write the answers down and keep in a place you can look at occa­sion­ally when you feel lost and won­der­ing why you started the busi­ness to begin with.
  2. Ask ques­tions con­stantly. Get over any idea of being intim­i­dated by any­thing just because you have not done it before. Advice that you get may be really good or really opin­ion­ated. Learn to be dis­cern­ing about what and who is giv­ing you the advice, i.e. if a sup­plier is telling you how “retail­ers” think, take it with a grain of salt…better to hear from a retailer how retail­ers think.
    Although I am a big fan of “learn as you go “, it can speed things up to work with peo­ple that know the busi­ness and can guide you.
  3. Hire con­sul­tants or tem­po­rary experts that have your suc­cess in mind. Although I am a big fan of “learn as you go “, it can speed things up to work with peo­ple that know the busi­ness and can guide you. If they give any indi­ca­tion that they are not “incor­po­rat­ing” you in the process then don’t go for­ward with them. Stay involved in the entire process.
  4. Ask for cre­den­tials and refer­rals when­ever pos­si­ble for any­one that will be asso­ci­ated with the busi­ness, espe­cially when there is pay­ment for their ser­vices or prod­uct. This includes: con­sul­tants, sup­pli­ers for prod­uct, pub­lic rela­tions peo­ple, and sales agents.
  5. Start sell­ing your prod­uct to retail­ers with cus­tomers that match the per­son you had in mind when you designed the prod­uct. Really study the other prod­ucts in a store or on a web­site before you approach them to be sure they are your cus­tomer. Start with “eas­ier” places until you have prac­ticed the feel of the busi­ness for a few months. Smaller stores or even web­sites can be eas­ier to approach and sell to.
    Start with “eas­ier” places until you have prac­ticed the feel of the busi­ness for a few months. Smaller stores or even web­sites can be eas­ier to approach and sell to.
  6. Be objec­tive about your own prod­uct. Develop a sense of dis­tance about any crit­i­cism you receive. In some cases, the crit­i­cism you receive will be your best friend when tak­ing steps to improve your prod­uct or the mar­ket­ing of it. Be dis­cern­ing of who is giv­ing you the crit­i­cism. Ask for hon­est opin­ions and file the opin­ions away in your mind until you start to see a pat­tern of the same sort of cri­tique. When it comes up often, it means there is some­thing to take another look at and see if improve­ments can be made.
  7. Learn the “lingo” of the busi­ness, i.e., the “juice”: the liq­uid of a fra­grance, SRP: Sug­gested Retail Price, COG’s: Cost of Goods, MU : Mark up on the price from whole­sale to retail….etc, etc. You will learn it by com­ing across it with peo­ple you inter­act with in the busi­ness and read­ing. Wom­ens Wear Daily, this indus­try news­pa­per reports about the Cos­metic, Fra­grance, and Skin care busi­ness on Fri­days of every week. It’s avail­able on line for a sub­scrip­tion. Read it to get a sense of what is hap­pen­ing in the business.
  8. Always com­par­i­son shop….on every­thing. Your com­pe­ti­tion (once you have real­ized who it is), sup­pli­ers,( in order to con­firm you are get­ting the best price), graphic artists, pub­lic rela­tions peo­ple, ware­houses, ship­ping, com­po­nents, pack­ag­ing, etc etc. Make a fre­quent process out of it so you are up to speed on changes occur­ring on all levels.
  9. Plan ahead as often as pos­si­ble. Think often about what your next steps are. Is it a new prod­uct? A big­ger retailer, a new mar­ket­ing idea for aware­ness? Have some goals to reach every 6 months.
  10. Keep expec­ta­tions real­is­tic but hopes high. Keep a list for your­self of what you have accom­plished since you started. Small steps keep adding up to big­ger ones. Smile a lot; you are in an excit­ing business

 
Read more details on each step in the upcoming book “The Beauty Entrepreneur” September 2012.